Changing a motorcycle tire




Changing a motorcycle tire

Article Navigation:
  • Photo
  • Mount a Motorcycle Tire Without Using Tools | Adventure Rider
  • Video
  • RELATED PAGES
  • RevZilla wrench Lemmy explains how to change your own tubeless motorcycle tires to save yourself some time and money.

    In the second place, knowing how to change a motorcycle tire on your own can save you some dough, some time, and more importantly, ensure that the job is.

    Motorcycle dealers charge as much as one hour of labor to change a tire – and quite rightly, since they are in business. Tire changing and.

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Use two tire levers to pry the bead up and over the rim. A valve core tool -- you can get these at any auto parts store. You can also drive a nail into the top of the 4x4"s on either side of the axle on both 4x4"s to hold the axle in place. When you're done, bring the tire over to the changing station and slide it down the threaded rod.

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    How To Change Motorcycle Tires

    Being at least somewhat conversant in the arcane art of tire wrangling has several advantages. First, plenty of cruisers still use traditional spoke rims and tube tires to support themselves. In the second place, knowing how to change a motorcycle tire on your own can save you some dough, some time, and more importantly, ensure that the job is done to your standards.

    Bear in mind that the following techniques are for tube-type tires. A few basic tools is all it takes. Every mechanic has his favorite set of irons. In my opinion a tire iron eight to 10 inches long is the best choice. True, long irons increase your mechanical advantage and in some cases you may need it. If not, you can order a valve-core removal tool through any motorcycle shop or trot down to the local auto-supply store and plunk down three bucks for one.

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Be sure to get the screwdriver style; the traditional automotive-style T-handle versions get hung up on the spokes. While you can certainly change the tire on the ground you may have to if you get a flat on the road , you'll find the job goes a whole lot easier if you work standing up. I use an old gallon grease drum as my tire stand, although a five-gallon pail or even a milk crate works well if set on a low bench.

    Cover the edges with something soft like an old blanket or a piece of hose to protect the spokes and rim and to prevent the thing from sliding around while you work. Like everything in life, the proper lubricant will smooth the way.

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Auto stores sell premixed tire lubricants—Rim Ease, Tire Slick and Slyde are three that come to mind. You can also use soapy water, and in a pinch WD or silicone.

    There are also a few optional tools you may find handy. They sell for between 10 and 30 bucks and are small enough to put in your pocket. With the tire on the stand, remove the valve core—even if the tire appears to be flat.

    Then remove the valve stem locknut. The hardest part of this job is breaking the bead. Once the first bead is broken, flip the tire and break the opposite side. With both beads broken, the tire can be removed from the rim.

    Changing a motorcycle tire

    Wet down the bead and rim with lubricant—the object is to make the bead slip over the rim as easily as possible. Install the rim protectors on the valve stem side of the rim and then slip your tire irons, hooked end up, under the bead next to the valve stem. Leaky knuckles make things slippery, so keep a few blowout patches handy just in case. Pry the bead up and over, taking small bites, until the entire bead is over the rim.

    Some guys prefer to use the flat end of the iron. Reach under the bead and pull the inner tube out. There should be a thin rubber band under the tube to prevent the ends of the spokes from chaffing through. Inspect the rim for signs of damage, particularly for cracks between the spoke holes. Use a wire brush or coarse Scotch-Brite pad to clean away any rust or corrosion. I prefer duct tape or wide electrical tape over the spokes—about three wraps should do it.

    How To Change & Balance Your Own Motorcycle Tires - MC GARAGE



    • Подписаться по RSSRSS
    • Поделиться VkontakteVkontakte
    • Поделиться на FacebookFacebook
    • Твитнуть!Twitter

    Leave a Reply

    Return to Top ▲TOP ▲